Somewhere Between: Toward the Middle Space Between Images and Words (signed)

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Somewhere Between: Toward the Middle Space Between Images and Words (signed)

25.00

NOW AVAILABLE IN THE U.S.

Published by National Taiwan University Press, this fully bilingual book, presented in English and Chinese, collects all the photograph/poetry collaborations to date between Jonas Yip and noted scholar and poet Wai-lim Yip. This volume includes the series Paris: Dialoguere:place, and Somewhere Between, along with the poetry inspired and written in response to those photographs. Also included are an introduction by Leo Ou-fan Lee, as well as a new essay tying it all together, by Wai-lim Yip.

350 pp. 80+ color and b+w images. Presented in English and Chinese.
First Edition published 2017 by National Taiwan University Press.
ISBN 13: 9789863502531 / ISBN 10: 9863502537

You can preview the book on the "take a peek" page, and be sure to check out the special print+book package available as well!

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From 80+ evocative photographs, pregnant high visions, come poetic echoes of measured pulses and impulses. Two artists, father and son, engaging in a cross-cultural, multi-generational dialogue with rhythmic, vital energy, tracing for the reader an odyssey of cultural and living complexes, explore the push-and-pull interactions between poetry's linguistic signs (seething images in the heart/mind) and photography's visual signs. We experience in this gap what American poet Ezra Pound called the “inter-recognition” between arts, “where paintings or sculptures seem, as it were, “just coming over to speech.”